Poem: Philip K. Dick videos, quotes + haiku

“Tears in the rain.”
Electric sheep leap
in Roy Batty’s perfect head
but he doesn’t sleep.

What he’s saying is fascinating. He inspired “the Matrix” the Wachowskis stole his concept! I super dislike them after their yellow-face film, “Cloud Atlas”. David Mitchell’s story was genius but the Wachowskis had to mutilate the image of Korean men by using thick eye prosthetics. They didn’t do that to the female Korean characters who portrayed sexually objectified clones. How did they get away with their racism? https://seoulsister.blog/2019/01/15/poem-yellow-face-rant/

I didn’t watch this, I’ll watch it later it’s fairly long, here’s the full footage of his interview https://youtu.be/RkaQUZFbJjE

This is a preview link, to the original film, (the recent remake was so boring, it was unwatchable even with Harrison Ford’s return. The CGI of Rachel was super creepy too). I think the original film is Ridley Scott’s masterpiece:

https://youtu.be/JMyz9bnKITY

An Audiobook on YouTube of “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?”: I’ve actually never read this book but am curious to listen to it.

I’m not sure if this quote is genuine but Philip K Dick seemed to have a psychic awareness of many current issues in his fiction.

16 Comments

  1. This is a favorite of mine. The original Blade Runner was epic in its time and Roy’s farewell mimics my own life experiences and so it remains my favorite scene. I was a young man when the movie came out and I have watched it many times and each time it reveals more of the genius of the story.

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    1. I loved the original Blade Runner too, yes the tears in the rain scene is so great, the redemption of Roy. I liked how Rutger Hauer played Roy, he had a child-like quality to him. The sets were gorgeous, and the Vangelis’ soundtrack was perfect. I watched it when I was much younger too, it withstood the test of time.

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      1. It is a Sci-Fi classic. I don’t believe they can redo it and capture the magic and subtle psyche that flows in every scene.

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  2. Blade Runner is one of my favourite films.

    Which is interesting because I’ve never really been into sci-fi films.

    Blade Runner though I’d describe as 1940s Film Noir meets Sci-Fi.

    Harrison Ford’s character is a lot like Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe.

    The voice over narration is a lot like the voice-over narration in the Philip Marlowe movies.

    The film does have a 1940s feel to it like in the clothes that Rachel wears.

    That scene of Rutger Haur’s Roy crying in the rain was one of the most haunting scenes I’ve seen in any movie.

    And Ford’s character narration posing the question the android was asking that we all ask, “Why are we here?”.

    A great masterpiece moment in a great masterpiece film.

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    1. I agree, the director’s cut removed the narration but I actually thought it improved the film to keep the private detective/film noir theme. I think the director and Ford didn’t want it but it explains things that you might not know unless you’ve read the novel. Think the film did raise the question of why we’re here and also what it is to be an evolved human. I liked the language they spoke which was partly Korean, I could recognize some of the words,

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    1. Thanks for the link, it added new information that I didn’t know. The Philip K Dick robot considers Hansen God, that says a lot to me. I think it’s more of a mistake to make them look human, “made in the image of God”. Creepy!

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      1. Thanks. I think our compassion gets exploited by films. Roy became symbolically Christ-like with the Holy Spirit dove and nail in his hand. We were conditioned to like him.

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